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Nutrient Deficiency Diseases

Diet And Supplements

Most nutritionists insist on a well-balanced diet consisting of the major food substances as an effective and economical way of obtaining nutrients for health. On the other hand, advocates of health food stores maintain that the FDA's required daily allowances (RDAs) for nutrients are much too low and that cultivation of much of our food supply and its preparation robs our diet of much of its nutrient value.

The American Dietetic Association (ADA) recommends that nutrient needs should come from a variety of foods taken from different dietary sources rather than self-prescribed vitamin supplementation. In order to avoid either the problem of nutrient deficiencies or excesses they recommend that physicians or licensed dieticians should be the source of prescribing supplementation.

The ADA, however, does make allowances for supplement usage under the following conditions: Iron supplements may be required by women when there is excessive menstrual bleeding. Pregnant and breast-feeding women need supplements, especially iron, folic acid, and calcium. People who are dieting and are therefore are on very low calorie diets may require supplementation if they are not getting the right amount of the nutrients they need. Vegetarians may need boosts of vitamin B-12, calcium, iron, and zinc. Newborns are sometimes given vitamin K to prevent abnormal bleeding. Those people who have diagonsised disorders or diseases or are being treated with medications which affects the absorption or metabolism of the nutrient may require supplementation.


Additional topics

Science EncyclopediaScience & Philosophy: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) to Ockham's razorNutrient Deficiency Diseases - Early Vitamin Deficiency Diseases, Scurvy, Beriberi, Pellagra, Rickets, Other Vitamin Deficiency Diseases - Mineral deficiency diseases