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Calendars

Types Of Calendars, The Development Of Our Present (gregorian) Calendar, Possible Future Calendar Reform And Additions

There are three units of time which have a direct basis in astronomy: the day, which is the period of time it takes for the Earth to make one rotation around its axis; the month, which is the period of time it takes for the Moon to revolve around the earth; and the year, which is the period of time it takes for the earth to make one revolution around the Sun.

The week has an indirect basis in astronomy—the seven days of the week probably were named for the seven objects which the ancients saw moving on the zodiac, which were the Sun, Moon, and the five planets that can be seen with the naked eye.

A calendar is a system for measuring long units of time, usually in terms of days, weeks, months, and years. The year is the most important time unit in most calenders, since the cycle of seasons, which are associated with change of climate in the earth's temperate and frigid zones, repeat in a yearly cycle with the change in the Sun's apparent position on the ecliptic as Earth revolves around the Sun.


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